AngioDefender

AngioDefender is not available in the United States

AngioDefender – diagnosis of early-stage cardiovascular disease in asymptomatic patients.

Everist Health has developed the AngioDefender CVD diagnostic system; the world’s first non-invasive device that successfully combines patent protected non-invasive sensor technology and a sophisticated software algorithm to quickly and cost effectively help physicians assess the presence of early-stage CVD and atherosclerosis.

AngioDefender helps physicians detect early-stage disease years before a patient presents with high blood pressure or elevated cholesterol levels.  Treatment of CVD is most effective at the earlier stages of CVD; early diagnosis and treatment prevents more serious forms of CVD such as severe hypertension, atherosclerosis, congestive heart failure and stroke2.

The AngioDefender Testing System

AngioDefender - A Major Advance in the Early Diagnosis of Cardiovascular Disease and Atherosclerosis

Limitations of current CVD diagnostic technology:  Clinical studies1 have demonstrated that cardiovascular disease and damage to the vascular system starts years before it can be detected with current testing methods, (such as blood pressure, lipid panels, EKG or angiograms); this damage impairs vascular health and eventually makes its presence known later as high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol levels; after significant damage has already been done to the vascular system.

Stages of Atherosclerosis (plaque formation) and Cardiovascular Disease

Clinical validation of the AngioDefender device has been completed3 in 6 clinical evaluations around the world and has demonstrated a strong correlation to the current gold-standard, BAUI.

  1. The AngioDefender procedure is non-invasive.
  2. The AngioDefender testing can be performed and results reported in about 15 minutes.  It can be used in a hospital, clinic or physician office by a doctor, nurse or technician.
  3. AngioDefender testing is applicable to any patient, regardless of age, gender, ethnicity or pre-existing conditions.
  4. AngioDefender test results are not dependent on user technique or operator proficiency.

AngioDefender is positioned to become a major aid to physicians in their diagnosis of early-stage cardiovascular disease in asymptomatic patients:

AngioDefender helps assess endothelial cell function; independent clinical studies have demonstrated that endothelial cell dysfunction is a key biomarker of atherosclerosis and CVD; it is also the earliest detectable sign of atherosclerosis4.

 

AngioDefender:  Clinical Utility

The AngioDefender system represents the most innovative solution to the technical, clinical, ease of use and cost challenges relating to assessment of endothelial dysfunction.  These advantages position AngioDefender testing to become part of the standard screening methodology applied by physicians to their patients; as an important part of helping physicians to assess early-stage cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis particularly in asymptomatic patients.  It is hoped that AngioDefender will help Physicians to diagnose early-stage CVD and atherosclerosis through:

  • Identification of asymptomatic patients with early-stage CVD within normal blood-pressure and lipid ranges but which may have sub-clinical atherosclerosis and CVD as determined by their AngioDefender test score
  • Periodic health assessment of patients
  • Screening asymptomatic patients with AngioDefender identified as at-risk because of family history or concomitant illness
  • Help in the assessment of the merits of prescribing pharmaco-therapy and life style modification.
  • AngioDefender represents an additional means of monitoring response to therapy and life-style modification, helping physicians to create personalized dosage and treatment regimens

 

 

Footnotes:

  1. Sources:  Journal of the American College of Cardiology Vol. 42, No. 7, 2003; The Clinical Implications of Endothelial Dysfunction; Michael E. Widlansky, MD, Noyan Gokce, MD, FACC, John F. Keaney, JR, MD, FACC, Joseph A. Vita, MD, FACC; Boston, Massachusetts; Journal of the American College of Cardiology Vol. 42, No. 7, 2003; The Clinical Implications of Endothelial Dysfunction; Michael E. Widlansky, MD, Noyan Gokce, MD, FACC, John F. Keaney, JR, MD, FACC, Joseph A. Vita, MD, FACC; Boston, Massachusetts; Carotid Intima-Media Thickness (i.e. the endothelial cells) and Coronary Artery Disease: an Indian Perspective, published in Noninvasive Cardiology, Escorts Heart Institute and Research Center, New Delhi, India; Gupta Hansa MD, Kartikeya Bhargava MD, Manish Bansal MD, Sharad Tandon MD, Ravi Kasliwal DM, 2003, Vol 11, No.
  2. Sources:  Research conducted by Psyma International Medical Marketing Research Gmbh and commissioned by the ESC & the Cardiovascular Round Table (CRT) Task Force 4.  The research was performed in 6 countries (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Poland & UK) Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, American Heart Association. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics, 2010
  3. AngioDefender Correlation with Brachial Artery Ultrasound:  Conducted at the Moscow Medical Academy.  This evaluation produced a strong correlation (R=0.84) between %FMD by AngioDefender with Brachial Artery Ultrasound; AngioDefender Study of Reproducibility: Conducted in Japan to demonstrate reproducibilityThe study demonstrated the ability of AngioDefender to deliver highly reproducible results; R=0.88’ AngioDefender Correlation Study With BAUI in Indian Population:  Conducted at Medanta, Medical City, high degree of correlation between BAUI and AngioDefender (R=0.77)
  4. Sources:  Journal of the American College of Cardiology Vol. 42, No. 7, 2003; The Clinical Implications of Endothelial Dysfunction; Michael E. Widlansky, MD, Noyan Gokce, MD, FACC, John F. Keaney, JR, MD, FACC, Joseph A. Vita, MD, FACC; Boston, Massachusetts; Journal of the American College of Cardiology Vol. 42, No. 7, 2003; The Clinical Implications of Endothelial Dysfunction; Michael E. Widlansky, MD, Noyan Gokce, MD, FACC, John F. Keaney, JR, MD, FACC, Joseph A. Vita, MD, FACC; Boston, Massachusetts; Carotid Intima-Media Thickness (i.e. the endothelial cells) and Coronary Artery Disease: an Indian Perspective, published in Noninvasive Cardiology, Escorts Heart Institute and Research Center, New Delhi, India; Gupta Hansa MD, Kartikeya Bhargava MD, Manish Bansal MD, Sharad Tandon MD, Ravi Kasliwal DM, 2003, Vol 11, No.